Period & Chamber

Ensemble Pygmalion

Introduction

Founded by Raphaël Pichon in 2006, Pygmalion is the product of the union between a choir and a period-instrument orchestra. Its repertory is nurtured by the filiations that link Bach to Mendelssohn, Schütz to Brahms, and Rameau to Gluck and Berlioz.

Pygmalion is in residence at the Opéra National de Bordeaux and appears regularly at the leading venues in France (Philharmonie de Paris, Opéra Royal de Versailles, Aix-en-Provence, Beaune, Toulouse, Saint-Denis, La Chaise-Dieu, Royaumont, Nancy) and internationally (Cologne, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, London, Beijing, Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Barcelona, Brussels).

Among its recent projects to have earned public and critical attention are J. S. Bach’s Köthener Trauermusik and Passions, the late versions of Rameau’s tragédies lyriques, Mozart’s C minor Mass and a programme of his music for the Weber sisters, Stravaganza d’Amore (the birth of opera at the court of the Medici), Mendelssohn’s Elias, and a choral trilogy devoted to the canon from the Romantic era to the twentieth century.

Pygmalion works with stage directors such as Katie Mitchell, Michel Fau and Jetske Mijnssen, who have brought an innovative approach to works including the Bach cantatas (Trauernacht), Rameau’s Dardanus and Luigi Rossi’s Orfeo.

After releasing the complete Missae breves of Bach and a version of Dardanus for Alpha, Pygmalion has recorded for harmonia mundi since 2014, a collaboration that has so far produced Bach’s Köthener Trauermusik, Rameau’s Castor et Pollux, Rheinmädchen, a new version of Dardanus, Rossi’s Orfeo (both on DVD), and the present release, Stravaganza d’Amore. Also released recently was Mozart and the Weber Sisters with Sabine Devieilhe (Erato).

The ensemble’s discography has received prizes in France and abroad, including a Gramophone Award 2016, CD des Monats (Opernwelt), Diapason d’Or de l’Année, Choc de Classica, ffff de Télérama, a Victoire de la Musique 2015, an Edison Klassiek Award 2016, a Grand Prix de l’Académie Charles Cros for 2016, and Best Classical Recording 2016 on Forbes.


Introduction

Founded by Raphaël Pichon in 2006, Pygmalion is the product of the union between a choir and a period-instrument orchestra. Its repertory is nurtured by the filiations that link Bach to Mendelssohn, Schütz to Brahms, and Rameau to Gluck and Berlioz.

Pygmalion is in residence at the Opéra National de Bordeaux and appears regularly at the leading venues in France (Philharmonie de Paris, Opéra Royal de Versailles, Aix-en-Provence, Beaune, Toulouse, Saint-Denis, La Chaise-Dieu, Royaumont, Nancy) and internationally (Cologne, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, London, Beijing, Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Barcelona, Brussels).

Among its recent projects to have earned public and critical attention are J. S. Bach’s Köthener Trauermusik and Passions, the late versions of Rameau’s tragédies lyriques, Mozart’s C minor Mass and a programme of his music for the Weber sisters, Stravaganza d’Amore (the birth of opera at the court of the Medici), Mendelssohn’s Elias, and a choral trilogy devoted to the canon from the Romantic era to the twentieth century.

Pygmalion works with stage directors such as Katie Mitchell, Michel Fau and Jetske Mijnssen, who have brought an innovative approach to works including the Bach cantatas (Trauernacht), Rameau’s Dardanus and Luigi Rossi’s Orfeo.

After releasing the complete Missae breves of Bach and a version of Dardanus for Alpha, Pygmalion has recorded for harmonia mundi since 2014, a collaboration that has so far produced Bach’s Köthener Trauermusik, Rameau’s Castor et Pollux, Rheinmädchen, a new version of Dardanus, Rossi’s Orfeo (both on DVD), and the present release, Stravaganza d’Amore. Also released recently was Mozart and the Weber Sisters with Sabine Devieilhe (Erato).

The ensemble’s discography has received prizes in France and abroad, including a Gramophone Award 2016, CD des Monats (Opernwelt), Diapason d’Or de l’Année, Choc de Classica, ffff de Télérama, a Victoire de la Musique 2015, an Edison Klassiek Award 2016, a Grand Prix de l’Académie Charles Cros for 2016, and Best Classical Recording 2016 on Forbes.