Veronika Eberle

Biography

Veronika Eberle’ exceptional talent, the poise and maturity of her musicianship have been recognised by some of the world’s finest orchestras, venues and festivals, as well as by some of the world’s most eminent conductors.

Highlights among future concerto engagements include debuts with the Seoul Philharmonic (Shostakovich 1), Hong Kong Sinfonietta and Yomiuri Nippon Symphony, Mozarteum Orchestra Salzburg (Berg), and return projects with the Bamberger Symphoniker (Berg with Ticciati), Munich Chamber Orchestra (play-direct Mozart and Haydn), Prague Symphony (Schumann), Berner Symphoniker (Prokofiev 1 with Venzago), BBC Philharmonic, BBC NOW and Bournemouth Symphony. Veronika will also join Antoine Tamestit for a Mozart Concertante project on period instruments with Laurence Equilbey’s Insula Orchestra.

Recent successes include the London Symphony Orchestra (Beethoven with Rattle), Montreal Symphony (Mendelssohn with Nagano), Concertgebouw Orchestra (Berg with Holliger), Gewandhausorchester Leipzig (Mozart with Langrée), Seattle Symphony (Berg with Morlot), Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (Beethoven with R.Abbado),  Paris National Opera (Beethoven with Philippe Jordan), Scottish Chamber Orchestra (Ticciati), CBSO (Ed Gardner), Northern Sinfonia (Zacharias) and Spanish National Orchestra (Dvorak with Harth-Bedoya). 

Recent recital highlights include London (Wigmore Hall Master Series), New York (Carnegie Hall debut series), Salzburg (Mozarteum), Munich (Herkulesaal), Amsterdam (Concertgebouw), Rome (Istituzione Universitaria dei Concerti), Brussels (Bozar), Paris (Theatre de la Ville), Zurich (Tonhalle) and the Lucerne Festival.

Veronika is a dedicated chamber musician, with regular partners including Shai Wosner, Lars Vogt, Martin Helmchen, Marie-Elisabeth Hecker, Renaud Capuçon, Antoine Tamestit, among many others. She will appear at the Mozartwoche Salzburg 2015 in a trio project with Mitsuko Uchida, and in May 2016 she will embark on a major chamber music tour with the soprano Anna Prohaska.

Veronika Eberle was born in 1988 in Donauwörth, Southern Germany, where she started violin lessons at the age of six. Four years later she became a junior student at the Richard Strauss Konservatorium in Munich, with Olga Voitova. After studying privately with Christoph Poppen for a year, she joined the Hochschule in Munich, where she studied with Ana Chumachenco 2001-2012. 

Veronika Eberle’s introduction by Sir Simon Rattle to a packed Salzburg Festpielhaus at the 2006 Salzburg Easter Festival, in a performance of the Beethoven concerto with the Berliner Philharmoniker, brought her to international attention. Other highlights among past collaborations include the New York Philharmonic (Gilbert),  Los Angeles Philharmonic (Bicket), NDR Hamburg (Gilbert), Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Berlin (Janowski), Hessischer Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Frankfurt (Paavo Järvi), Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart (Marriner), Bamberger Symphoniker (Ticciati, Nott), Tonhalle Orchester Zurich (Michael Sanderling), NHK Symphony (Kout, Stenz, Norrington), La Fenice Orchestra (Inbal) and the Rotterdam Philharmonic (Rattle, Gaffigan, Nézet-Seguin).

Over the years, Veronika Eberle has benefited from the support of a number of prestigious organisations, including the Nippon Foundation, the Borletti-Buitoni Trust (Fellowship in 2008), the Orpheum Stiftung zur Förderung Junger Solisten (Zurich), the Deutsche Stiftung Musikleben (Hamburg) and the Jürgen-Ponto Stiftung (Frankfurt). She won the first prize at the 2003 Yfrah Neaman International Competition in Mainz, and was awarded Audience Awards by the patrons of the Schleswig-Holstein and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festivals. She was a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist 2011-2013 and was a Dortmund Konzerthaus “Junge Wilde” artist 2010-2012. 

Veronika Eberle plays the  “Dragonetti” Stradivarius (1700), on generous loan from the Nippon Music Foundation.

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News & Features

Repertoire

Please note: this repertoire list is for reference only. The choice of repertoire for a particular project remains at the artist's discretion.

BEETHOVEN
Concerto in D, Op.61
Romance in G, Op.40
Romance in F, Op.50
Triple Concerto

BERG
Violin Concerto

BRAHMS
Concerto in D, Op.77

BRUCH
Concerto in G minor, op.26

DVORAK
Concerto in A minor, Op.53

HAYDN
Concerto in G
Concerto in C

KABALEWSKI
Concerto No.1 in C, Op.48

LALO
Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

MENDELSSOHN
Concerto in D minor
Concerto in E minor, Op.64

MOZART
Concerto No.1 in Bb, K207
Concerto No.3 in G, K216
Concerto No.4 in D, K218
Concerto No.5 in A, K219
Rondo in C, K373

SAINT-SAENS
Concerto No.2 in B minor, Op.61

SHOSTAKOVICH
Concerto No.1

SIBELIUS
Concerto in D minor, Op.47

STRAVINSKY
Concerto in D

TCHAIKOVSKY
Violin Concerto

WIENIAWSKI
Concerto in D minor, Op.22

VIEUXTEMPS
Concerto No.5 in A minor, Op.37

VIVALDI
The Four Seasons

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Audio

Schedule

Colston Hall , Bristol

BRAHMS: Academic Festival Overture
BRAHMS:  Concerto for violin and cello 
BRHAMS: Symphony no. 1 
Veronika Eberle, violin; Andreas Brantelid, cello; BBC National Orchestra of Wales,  Tadaaki Otaka, conductor

Bibliotheksaal , Polling

MILHAUD: Suite for violin, clarinet and piano op157b
BRAHMS: Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A op100
SCHUMANN:  Studies in Canon form. op56
BARTOK: 'Kontraste' for clarinet, violin and piano 

with Herbert Schuh, piano and Sebastian Manz, clarinet

Herkulessaal , Munich

MILHAUD: Suite for violin, clarinet and piano op157b
BRAHMS: Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A op100
SCHUMANN:  Studies in Canon form. op56
BARTOK: 'Kontraste' for clarinet, violin and piano 

with Herbert Schuh, piano and Sebastian Manz, clarinet

Stadthalle, Lindau

MILHAUD: Suite for violin, clarinet and piano op157b
BRAHMS: Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A op100
SCHUMANN:  Studies in Canon form. op56
BARTOK: 'Kontraste' for clarinet, violin and piano 

with Herbert Schuh, piano and Sebastian Manz, clarinet

Theatre de Vevey, Vevey

MILHAUD: Suite for violin, clarinet and piano op157b
BRAHMS: Sonata for violin and piano no. 2 in A op100
SCHUMANN:  Studies in Canon form. op56
BARTOK: 'Kontraste' for clarinet, violin and piano 

with Herbert Schuh, piano and Sebastian Manz, clarinet

Grieghallen, Bergen

Ørjan Matre: preSage
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto no.1
Tchaikovsky: Symphony no.4

Stavanger Symphony Orchestra
Christian Vásquez, conductor
Veronika Eberle, violin

Norske Opera, Oslo

Ørjan Matre: preSage
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto no.1
Tchaikovsky: Symphony no.4

Stavanger Symphony Orchestra
Christian Vásquez, conductor
Veronika Eberle, violin

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Press

Recital, 28 July 2014

Wigmore Hall, with Shai Wosner, piano

"The phrasing and interplay between Eberle and Wosner were immaculate and both players captured the feverish and unsettled character of the music...As the music progressed, Eberle whipped things up to create a dark and grotesque expressionist nightmare in a really superb piece of violin playing...The final galloping tarantella was played with enormous energy and verve and the rhythms remained taut throughout before both players drove the sonata to its triumphant conclusion.
(Beethoven: Sonata in A major, Schönberg: Phantasy, Beethoven: Kreutzer Sonata) 
Seen and Heard International

Beethoven

Violin Concerto

London Symphony Orchestra, Sir Simon Rattle

"Whilst it had always seemed meandering in previous performances I have seen, Rattle and soloist Veronika Eberle shaped the sublime ebb and flow of the movement beautifully. The Larghetto was warm and spacious, and the LSO produced some startlingly tender pianissimi. Eberle’s Stradivarius lived up to its reputation and her musicality matched its rich, golden tone. The finale brimmed with vitality so powerful that I was suddenly struck by how reminiscent this movement is of the third movement “Merry gathering of country folk” of the Pastoral Symphony." Bachtrack.com
"Rattle and Eberle probed ever more searchingly under the skin of a concerto which is sometimes treated as merely the quintessence of serenity. Not here, however. Exceptionally delicate dynamics were a hallmark throughout, as both orchestra and soloist spun the first and second movements out into the merest scintillas of sound, which made the closing rondo all the more impressive for being harder won than usual." The Guardian

Beethoven

Violin Concerto

KollegiumMusicum Winterthur

"Es fehlte an nichts: stupend die Intonation, die schnellen Läufe, die Ausdruckskraft im schlanken und straffen Ton. Nur zog das alles da und dort gar schnell an einem vorüber. Im Finalsatz des Konzerts gab es neben dem wunderbaren Flirren auch verhuschte Momente. Das Andante davor entfaltete, und das war hier keine Frage des Metronoms, seine volle Intensität eher in den sich verdichtenden Variationen als im melodischen Verströmen des Themas. Atemraubend ist gut, weitatmig aber auch. Wie viel innere Ruhe ihr Spiel auch entfalten kann, erwies Veronika Eberle besonders mit ihrem fein ausgehorchten Bach in der Zugabe." www.landbote.ch

Beethoven

Violin Concerto

St Paul Chamber Orchestra, R Abbado. May 2014

"...among the most exciting, pulse-pounding, confidently rendered interpretations of the Beethoven Violin Concerto that I've encountered in decades of concerts...Her combination of a wonderfully pure tone and a full, forceful sound gave an early indication that she was a special musician, but it soon became clear that she was also an interpreter of tremendous depth. Seldom do you hear such roiling conflict emerge in the Beethoven concerto's first movement, Eberle's lovely high trills giving way to lyrical lines soaring above the orchestra, then the two astoundingly co-existing in her cadenza."

TwinCities.com

Beethoven

Heildelberger Frühling, 5 April 2014

with Igor Levit, piano

"Sie nehmen ihre Interpretation dynamisch extrem zurück, einmal, im langsamen Satz, sogar bis an die untere Hörschwelle. Jedes Detail gewinnt dadurch eine Leuchtkraft, als betrachte man ein mit Zeichen und Figuren übervölkertes Gemälde durch die Lupe. Dass das Ergebnis in keiner Weise manieriert klingt, sondern gerade das Disparat-Vielgestaltige und radikal Zukunftsweisende des späten Beethoven offenlegt, ist eine der kleinen Sensationen dieses Abschlusskonzertes". Frankfurter Allegemeine

Mendelssohn

Violin Concerto, Oct 2012

Scottish Chamber Orchestra


"The symphony was prefaced by a beguilingly energetic and beautiful performance of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto by Veronika Eberle"

Scottish Herald
"no-one could argue with the quality of the playing, which was magnificent: delicate and sparkling, almost forensic in its precision." Seen and Heard International

Vivaldi

Four Seasons

Los Angeles Philharmonic

"Eberle was a commanding stage presence even in quiet passages—the true test of a star performer. Her full, golden tone became gritty when called for, and her vibrato expanded and contracted appropriately to the season. In “Spring,” the interplay between Eberle and concertmaster Martin Chalifour became a Messiaen-like celebration of birdsong. The ensemble, especially vivid in “Summer,” conveyed inner and outer weather, with the delicacy of Eberle’s performance contrasting memorably with her virtuosic intensity." LA Times

Recital, Feb 2009

Weill Recital Hall, New York

"Ms. Eberle’s introverted intensity and interpretive boldness made an immediate impression. Where her partner, the pianist Oliver Schnyder, was amiable and gregarious in Beethoven’s Violin Sonata in G (Op. 96), Ms. Eberle was sweet and demure. Her phrases trailed off into distracted murmurs in the Adagio, lending the music an affectingly poignant ache... A formidable technique was never an end in itself... In Janacek’s Violin Sonata, Ms. Eberle and Mr. Schnyder brought out a bustle, bite and anxiety that rang true to its World War I-era gestation." New York Times

Recital, February 2009

Herkulessaal Munich

"Concerts like this are among the highlights even a professional music critic is rarely privileged to enjoy. […] The way she presented Beethoven’s last violin sonata as an intimate and spontaneous dialogue with Oliver Schnyder, which was both full of esprit and profundity; the rhythmic virtuosity with which she tackled Schubert’s tricky B minor rondo brilliant without failing to do wonderful justice to the surprising harmonic turns, embedded cantabile passages and melancholic mood changes; the explosive verve with which she attacked Janacek’s sonata revealing its existential commitment; the intoxicating joy with which she celebrated youthful Richard Strauss’s sonata as an orgy of sensual violin sounds — all of this made it an evening to remember. […] Her tone is warm, invariably lucid and resonant, and she possesses an admirable ability to adapt it to the character and style of the composition, which enabled her to realize the emotional stylistic demands made by Schubert and Janacek with equal perfection. She is also an embodiment of the idea that performing chamber music is a “concerted” art, a philosophy she shares with her Swiss accompanist." Süddeutsche Zeitung