Alexander Shelley

Introduction

Alexander Shelley was appointed Music Director-designate of Canada's National Arts Centre Orchestra in October 2013 and will take up the position of Music Director in September 2015.   In 2014 he completed his fifth year as Chief Conductor of the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra where he has transformed the orchestra’s playing, education work and touring activities which have included tours to Italy, Belgium, China and a re-invitation to the Musikverein in Vienna.
He is in demand from orchestras around the world including the Royal Philharmonic, the Philharmonia, City of Birmingham Symphony, Rotterdam Philharmonic, Stockholm Philharmonic, Mozarteum Orchester Salzburg, Konzerthausorchester Berlin, DSO Berlin, Leipzig Gewandhaus, Simon Bolivar, Seattle and Houston Symphony Orchestras.  Further afield Alexander is a regular guest with the top Asian and Australasian orchestras. 
The 2014/15 season and beyond includes regular appearances in Ottawa and Nuremberg and guest engagements with, among others, Camerata Salzburg, Czech Philharmonic, DSO Berlin, Gothenburg Symphony,  Helsinki Philharmonic, Konzerthausorchester Berlin, NDR Hannover, Melbourne Symphony, Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, and the Royal Philharmonic. His first recording for Deutsche Grammophon, an album with Daniel Hope and the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, will be released in September 2014. 

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Media Player

Video

  • DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON CD
    Daniel Hope & Alexander Shelley talk about "Escape to Paradise"

Schedule

TBA, M'Schwarzach

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto
BEETHOVEN Symphony No 9

NUREMBERG SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND PHILHARMONIC CHOIR/
ERIK SCHUMANN (Violin)/MOJCA ERDMANN (Sop)/KATHARINA PEETZ (Mezzo)/ROBERT KÜNZLI (Tenor)/JOCHEN KUPFER (Bariton)/MONTEVERDICHOR WÜRZBURG



Meistersingerhalle, Nuremburg

School's Concert


WALTON  As You Like It Suite
BERLIOZ  Romeo et Juliette
Scène d‘amour
Heitere Nacht
Der Garten der Capulets,
Schweigsam und leer
Love Scene
VERDI  Ballet Music from Macbeth
TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture
WALTON Shakespeare in Love (Film Music) 


NUREMBURG SYMPHONY

Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg

WALTON  As You Like It Suite 
BERLIOZ  Romeo et Juliette
Scène d‘amour
Heitere Nacht
Der Garten der Capulets,
Schweigsam und leer
Love Scene
VERDI  Ballet Music from Macbeth
TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture


NUREMBURG SYMPHONY

Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg

WALTON  As You Like It Suite 
BERLIOZ  Romeo et Juliette
Scène d‘amour
Heitere Nacht
Der Garten der Capulets,
Schweigsam und leer
Love Scene
VERDI  Ballet Music from Macbeth
TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture


NUREMBURG SYMPHONY

Brucknerhaus, Linz

WALTON  As You Like It Suite 
BERLIOZ  Romeo et Juliette
Scène d‘amour
Heitere Nacht
Der Garten der Capulets,
Schweigsam und leer
Love Scene
VERDI  Ballet Music from Macbeth
TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture


NUREMBURG SYMPHONY

National Arts Centre , Ottawa

NIKOLAI Merry Wives of Windsor Overture

KORNGOLD Much Ado about Nothing 

MENDELSSOHN Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream (complete)


NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE ORCHESTRA

COLM FEORE narrator

DONNA FEORE director

MAGHAN  MCPHEE soprano

WALLIS GIUNTA mezzo-soprano

National Arts Centre , Ottawa

MENDELSSOHN Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream (complete)


NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE ORCHESTRA

COLM FEORE narrator

DONNA FEORE director

MAGHAN  MCPHEE soprano

WALLIS GIUNTA mezzo-soprano

Meistersingerhalle, Nuremburg

Bertolt Brecht School performance 


NUREMBURG SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

BEETHOVEN Freude schöner Götterfunken

ELGAR Pomp and Circumstance

RIMSKY KORSAKOV Neapolitan Suite

VERDI Nabucco (Choral)

BIZET Habanera from Carmen

JOBIM The Girl from Ipanema

PIAZZOLLA Oblivion

PIAZZOLLA Adios Nonino

BERNSTEIN The Magnificent Seven

SOUSA Stars and Stripes forever

GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue for trumpet and orchestra

TRADITIONAL CHINESE Jasmin Flower

KOSAKU Akatombo (arr. for Orchestra)

TCHAIKOVSKY Trepak from the Nutcracker

TCHAIKOVSKY 1812 Overture

Meistersingerhalle, Nuremburg

NUREMBURG SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA


WALTON As You Like It Suite 

BERLIOZ Romeo et Juliette

Scène d‘amour

Heitere Nacht 

Der Garten der Capulets, 

Schweigsam und leer 

Love Scene

VERDI Ballet Music from Macbeth

TCHAIKOVSKY  Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture

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Interviews and Podcasts

Classical Music Magazine featured Alexander Shelley in their March 2014 edition. Click here to read the article. 


Click here to listen to Alexander Shelley in discussion with Houston Public Radio further to his concerts with the Houston Symphony in October 2012.


German video interview with NZ-Klickparade about Alexander's Chief Music Directorship at the Nuremburg Symphony Orchestra.
  
You can also hear Alexander discuss the state of Opera with Nicholas Atkinson (principal tuba of the National Arts Centre Orchestra, Ottowa) on their NACOcast from September 17th 2012. Click here to listen now.
  
Recently the BBC broadcast a short profile featuring Alexander working with his orchestra in Nuernberg and talking about the role of a conductor. To view this exciting insight into Alexander Shelley's world click here.

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Press

Dutilleux & Franck

Orchestre National de Montpellier

Montpellier, France

"...The concert was masterfully directed.The baton of the magnificent conductor Alexander Shelley danced gracefully throughout the evening. The exceptional control of the maestro was particularly evident when he dispensed with his score, like a tightrope-walker without a safety net, this in the romantic and sublime symphony in D minor of Franck entirely from memory! A talent which seems to predict a beautiful future for the maestro, amply evidenced by the fact that he is so widely in demand  by the greatest orchestras world-wide, such as the Orchestra of Canada’s National Arts Centre where he will take up the post of Music Director in September 2015.

At the peak of their artistry, the talented musicians of the Opera Orchestre National  de Montpellier and the brilliant  conductor were able to reveal all the beauty of César Franck's work. Between power and restraint, the passionate notes giving way naturally to moments of tender sweetness in a romantic flow. Each note was controlled, fluid, in its place.  Nothing was missing. Except perhaps an encore,  warmly pleaded for by the enraptured audience..." [TRANSLATION]

Eléonore Vern, Le Nouveau Montpellier

MOZART

Cosi fan tutte

Opéra National de Montpellier

"...Cosi fan tutte finishes the cycle [Montpellier Mozart/da Ponte trilogy staged by French metteur en scène and esthète Jean-Paul Scarpitta] again with splendid players from the Orchestra National de Montpellier here conducted by Alexander Shelly. This young English conductor made immediate musical impact in the overture by imposing musical depth rather than dramatic thrust. Each moment of Mozart’s music was explored, there was no beginning nor end..." Michael Milenski, Opera Today

BORODIN/SHOSTAKOVICH/RIMSKY-KORSAKOV

Orchestre Symphonique de Quebec, November 2013

Grand Theatre de Quebec

Alexander Shelley Transforms the OSQ [Translation]

If you missed this concert, hurry along to the grand theatre this morning for the repeat performance. You will hear the Quebec Symphony Orchestra at its best. Appearing on the rostrum of the OSQ,  Wednesday evening, the conductor Alexander  Shelley transformed the instrumentalists  of every section and every  desk. He respected them and treated them as true musicians from first to last.  As a result, they were with him all the way; put themselves totally at his service; never let go  of him. The performance that emerged was truly exceptional and held the audience spellbound. Alexander Shelley is British.  Barely  into his mid-thirties, he has just been named music director of the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. With luck we should see him again in Quebec one of these days. This conductor is not only young, he is inspiring.  He remains in close and continuous contact with the orchestra and it is in this way that he manages to get the best out of them. From the Steppes of Borodin, the first work on the programme, one was aware of the efficiency of his beat, understated, clear, consistent, based on economy of means and discipline, and which completely transcends the technical dimension.  He obtains results of great expressive strength. Like that moment where, in the 121st bar the fortissimo erupts. It was like a cry of joy. The Franco -Belgian cellist N. A. Brought fire to the stage or so it felt with his ardent interpretation of Shostakovich's concerto. The young man captivates enchant/ mesmerises the audience.  In the cadenza, we sink /decend with him into what seems like a void. Time seems to stand still. One hardly dares breathe. For some moments one comes close to madness. THE OSQ kept the best till after the interval, with Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherezade.  AS drew  diverse  energy  from each movement.   A specific flavour, a unique perfume. Everything was paced to perfection, from the sparkling trombones to the twinkling triangle. The harp has never had such panache. The innocent grace of the charming clarinet duo and of the little drum which open The Young Prince and the Princess led to heights of  mad sensuality.The audience perfectly heard the difference. The hall, full for once, leapt to its feet to cheer orchestra and conductor.
Translation of article from 14. November 2013, Richard Boisvert (Le Soleil/ La Presse)

Debussy & Brahms

DSO Debut at the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival

Konzertkirche Neubrandenburg

“...One was already able to vouch for the artistic authority of the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin and now one can say the same thing of Alexander Shelley [...] He let Debussy unfold in all possible colours and forms, created varied images - or their reflections - and turned the sonically diverse moods into a kaleidoscope of living and virtually visible natural phenomenon. In the Brahms he drilled deeper, increased the intensity of sound and heightened the expression...” TRANSLATION Ekkehard Ochs, Ostsee-Zeitung

VERDI Requiem

Mozarteum Orchester Salzburg

Grosses Festspielhaus, Salzburg

"...Der Dirigent Alexander Shelley setzte auf schlankes, über weite Strecken filigranes, leises und transparentes Singen und Musizieren. Das ausgezeichnet disponierte Mozarteumorchester lohnte den präzisen Schlag und die souveräne Werkdisposition Shelleys mit delikat durchhörbarem, selbst in den dramatischen Ausbrüchen des „Dies irae“ mit mächtigem Schlagwerk und Ferntrompeten genau fokussierten Klang [...] Dieses Salzburger Verdi-Requiem war (und ist noch heute, Freitag) eine eigenständige, kluge, überzeugende und ernsthaft durchgestaltete Interpretation. Alexander Shelley empfiehlt sich damit für weitere Aufgaben..."
Karl Harb, Salzburger Nachrichten
"...Das Mozarteumorchester unter der Leitung von Alexander Shelley brachte diese Achterbahnfahrt der Armen Seelen zu einer packenden Aufführung. Der Salzburger Bachchor - diesmal in Bataillons-Stärke angetreten – stand für die Menge der himmlischen und höllischen Heerscharen.Die Schrecken des Himmels und der Hölle könnten nicht spürbarer
werden, als in diesem ständigen Wechsel der Extreme. Das Mozarteumorchester zeigte sich – wenige Tage nach Auftritten bei Mozartwoche mit ihren auch nicht geringen Anforderungen – wieder einmal in Bestform. Präzision und Klarheit im Streicherklang, bedrohlich dramatisch gaben sich die Blechbläser, lieblich versöhnlich (sofern sie nicht höllisch zu pfeifen hatten) die Holzbläser: Technisch perfekt sind sie alle miteinander. Auffallend in der insgesamt mitreißenden Aufführung bei der Kulturvereinigung im Großen Festspielhaus war, das der Dirigent Alexander Shelley die dramatischen Teile wohl mit größter Energie und Verve vorüberdonnern, in den lyrisch sängerischen Passagen das Spannungsniveau aber beinahe zu sehr sinken ließ. So manche der elegischen Linien hätte man sich doch spannungsvoller, pulsierender gewünscht. Der bewegende Gesamteindruck der vielfarbig geschilderten Episoden zwischen Tod und Verzweiflung und Hoffnung
und Erlösung hat dennoch nicht gelitten..."
Heidemarie Klabacher, Dreh Punkt Kultur

National Arts Centre Orchestra

Southam Hall, Ottawa

'...The orchestral accompaniment, under the baton of Alexander Shelley, matched the solo playing in spirit and execution. The work's evocative orchestration came across beautifully. The interplay between the winds and the solo violin in the second movement was particularly delicious.
Shelley opened the program with Schubert's two-movement Symphony no. 8 in B minor, traditionally called the Unfinished. There is no dearth of theories as to why the composer stopped writing it, but as it stands it is one of his most perfect works, and he may have considered it complete, as Beethoven considered his Opus 111, written at roughly the same time, complete in two movements...'
The Ottawa Citizen

Elgar, Enigma Variations

Houston Symphony Orchestra

Houston, USA

'...Shelley, principal conductor of the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra, showed subtle command with a balanced, tasteful reading. After the carefully measured initial statement, each variation found its distinct flavor, yet overall continuity was sustained through the music's quiet strength and nobility. Shelley showed flair highlighting the droll touches and novel colors in livelier sections yet gave gently flowing movement and warmth to the more deeply felt variations...' Everett Evans, The Houston Chronicle

STRAUSS/ELGAR/SIBELIUS

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Cadogan Hall, London

'...There was a remarkable air of expectation in the foyer of Cadogan Hall – one could not remember such a full gathering of concert-goers for what might, on paper, be regarded as a pretty standard programme, for some time, but there was something ‘in the air’. There was something else, too, which struck your correspondent: the number of distinguished musicians in the audience. This doesn’t happen very often, unless the conductor or soloist is an international figure, or has in some other way entered the musical public’s consciousness, but it certainly added an air of excited anticipation. 
Sharp-eyed members of the audience would have noted something else: there was no conductor’s stand. Clearly, he was to dispense with the music and conduct from memory. Now, an experienced concert-goer (which your correspondent is) will probably, in those few moments of individual thought in which he may indulge before the arrival of any conductor, be reminded of the adage (so familiar at one time that no-one can remember who first said it) that “the score should be in your head, not your head in the score” and welcome the self-assurance of any musician who has such admirable belief in his own abilities. But it can bring dangers: in the course of almost sixty years of regular concert-going, your correspondent can recall the (thankfully) few occasions when a score-less conductor has suffered a lapse of concentration and become embarrassingly flummoxed at a momentary loss of memory, only to be rescued by a dependable orchestra leader. 
Such thoughts did pass through my mind before this concert began, not least the fact that Richard Strauss’s Don Juan has arguably the most difficult beginning of any repertoire piece: Alexander Shelley      was certainly risking a lot, even before we had heard a note. In the event, by bar four one’s fears proved groundless. Not only was this opening string flourish immaculately played, but the command of this 32-year-old conductor was such as to grab the attention – not only of the musicians but also of the members of his audience, distinguished or not – and hold it throughout. One can write about how experienced a concert-goer one is and how rather hard-bitten as a critic one may have become, but the thrill of encountering for the first time a musician of considerable gifts and extraordinarily impressive interpretative qualities – in other words, a musician who one can readily imagine has all the qualities required to become a great conductor – well, it happens very rarely, but it happened here at Cadogan Hall. Shelley inspired the Royal Philharmonic to play at the top of its game: that, in itself, is no mean feat, but the result was a totally, profoundly impressive account of Don Juan that has not, in my experience, been equalled since I heard Sir Thomas Beecham conduct this very work with this very orchestra (as was) in the Royal Festival Hall in the mid-1950s. This was a great performance, believe you me. 
Shelley wisely used a score for Elgar’s Cello Concerto. The soloist was the excellent Guy Johnston, who caught the mood of this (still, in many ways) elusive masterpiece to perfection. After the high-powered wide-ranging moods of the Strauss, it was no little achievement to enter Elgar’s world of immediate post-World War One contemplation, and to make convincing sense of it: Johnston, Shelley, and the Royal Philharmonic delivered a wonderful performance. 
And so to Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony, no less; Shelley’s was once again without music – nothing, it seemed, was to come between this conductor and his musicians. And what that first half had led us to hope for came most assuredly to pass: a performance of this indestructible masterpiece that was total – total in its penetration and depth, in its profound musical understanding and in its extraordinary quality of reaching out to the audience as if for the first time: this was not Shelley’s Sibelius Fifth Symphony – it was Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony. The details remain fresh in my memory: I hope they never fade. I have rarely heard the preparation for the concluding pages so superbly paced and prepared as they were on this occasion: the elision to 3/4 in the first movement – a Becher’s Brook of a symphonic passage – was positively life-enhancing and so completely, convincingly organic as to make one cheer. It was all as good as this. 
I have no doubt, on this one showing, that I was in the company of a conductor of superlative gifts; Alexander Shelley’s technique is splendid, never exaggerated and always clear and direct, yet equally propelled musically by a deep understanding of the passage in question, where the particular phrase is going and why, and its place within the overall symphonic picture. He is, despite his relative youth, an experienced orchestral musician himself who has played under some of the most admired conductors on the planet; the roster of international orchestras he has conducted is impressive and he is already Principal Conductor of the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra – but why has he been snapped up by a good German orchestra whilst we in this country offer our native conductors so little in the way of the encouragement that such as he (not that there are so many of his quality) manifestly deserve? 
Only one of the five permanent BBC orchestras is conducted by a Briton; we have come to expect foreign conductors of our publicly-funded orchestras as a matter of course, in much the same way as we expect Polish plumbers to turn up when we have a leak. But if it means catching the Eurostar to hear Alexander Shelley in Nuremburg, then even a day out, Wallace and Gromit style, would be worth it. Hopefully the Royal Philharmonic will invite Shelley back. We shall see...'

Robert Matthew-Walker, ClassicalSource.com

Recordings

Escape to Paradise

DANIEL HOPE - ESCAPE TO PARADISE

The Hollywood Album
Alexander Shelley
Sting · Max Raabe
Maria Todtenhaupt · Jacques Ammon
Quintet of the Deutsches Kammerorchester Berlin
Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra
Deutsche Grammophon